Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce)
Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce)
Book, Music and Lyrics By Bob Walton and Jim Walton
Jimmy and Bobby Martin have the opportunity of a life time – writing a song for a major motion picture – except they have only a few hours to do it. From the creators of the hysterical revue MID-LIFE! THE CRISIS MUSICAL, DOUBLE TROUBLE (A MUSICAL TOUR DE FARCE) is a spoof of 1940s Hollywood in which 2 performers play 10 different larger than life characters. Written and originally performed by Bob and Jim Walton, this tale of singing, dancing and song-writing brothers, is sure to get you laughing and your toes tapping.
Description Tags: Strong Role for a Leading ManMusical ComedyClassic BroadwayJazzy.
Cast Size: Small (1-10). Vocal Demands: Moderate. Dance Requirements: Some Dancing Required. Good For: College/UniversityAmateur/CommunityProfessional Theatre.
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News for Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce)

R&H Theatricals sat down with Bob & Jim Walton to talk about their newest show, DOUBLE TROUBLE (A Musical Tour de Farce.)

R&H: Tell us a little bit about DOUBLE TROUBLE.

Bob: It’s basically about two singing/dancing/songwriting brothers who are flown to LA to write the big hit song for a movie musical and all the crazy characters they meet at the studio.... read more

Trivia for Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce)

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  • Articles
The Witchia Eagle , February 08, 1970

'DOUBLE TROUBLE' AT MARY JANE TEALL THEATER BUD NORMAN, The Wichita Eagle Anyone old enough to recall the era of Donald O'Connor dancing up walls, Bob Hope cracking wise and Jimmy Durante singing something with a 'hot-cha -cha' has no doubt lamented that they just don't make such energetic, innocent and unabashedly corny entertainment anymore. Such old fogies and former late-show addicts will be heartened to hear that Jim and Bob Walton still do things that old-fashioned way. The brothers' 'Double Trouble,' staged at Century II's Mary Jane Teall Theater by the local Stage One Productions, is an amusing and uplifting slice of '40s-style musical comedy. Appropriately set in the Hollywood of the early '40s, 'Double Trouble' concerns a pair of brothers - coincidentally named Jim and Bob - who have been summoned to a movie studio's rehearsal space to write a hit song in a hurry. Their efforts are frequently interrupted, of course, by such wacky characters as a stone-deaf sound engineer, a booming boss, a buffoonish intern, a sleazy theatrical agent and a sultry scheming screen siren with something extra. The ensuing complicated and largely inconsequential plot serves simply as a framework for 'Double Trouble's' all-important gimmick: All of the characters are played by Jim and Bob Walton, who also wrote the script to showcase their numerous and varied talents. With help from body doubles, dummies, tape recordings and some shrewd stage prestidigitation, the actors somehow manage to never cross paths with themselves. Fortunately for all concerned, the Waltons are well up to the challenges posed by their ploy. Both have enjoyed busy careers on their own, as well as together in a revue called 'My Brother's Keeper.' Their current effort provides them ample opportunity to show off their fancy hoofing, fine singing, plunky piano-playing, a wide range of comic characters, and a truly astounding capacity for quick costume changes. Perhaps even more important, the pair possess pleasing, regularguy personalities that render all the characters likable and imbue the entire production with the kind of golly-gee enthusiasm that defined musical comedy of the '40s. The good feeling keeps the laughs coming right through the occasional flat jokes, and allows the audience in on the bigger jokes that result from the frequently obvious tricks employed in the quick changes. While 'Double Trouble' doesn't contain any tunes that the audience is likely to be humming on the way to the parking lot, all of the songs are pleasant and true to their old-time roots. There's no substitute for seeing live musicians in a pit, but musical director John Glaudini does a nice job on his taped accompaniment. Director Greg Ganakas' light touch has contributed to an efficiently staged production, with considerable help from Casey Nicholaw's refreshing old-fashioned choreography, J. Branson's good-looking set and Martha Bromelmeier's evocative costumes. Sean Roberson's lighting design shows a fine sense of comic timing, and Larry Jones' and Tony Meola's sound design meets most if not all of the show's myriad challenges. Additional performances of 'Double Trouble' are at 8 p.m. today and 2 p.m. Sunday, and 8 p.m. April 4-6 and 2 p.m. April 7 in Century II's Mary Jane Teall Theater. Tickets are $25 to $20 for evenings and $20 to $15 for matinees.

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Writers Notes for Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce)

www.DoubleTroubleTheMusical.com
Written By: Bob and Jim Walton

Some explanation is needed about reading DOUBLE TROUBLE. Even though it is a two-character show, it is deceptively complicated. We always said the sound department is the third character in the show, because they are very, very busy back there! You will see in the script that one character will be talking on stage and then, for example, goes into the bathroom. Once the actor is in there, a recorded voiceover continues the scene with the other actor who remains on stage. Meanwhile, the other actor is running around behind the set, changing clothes and preparing to enter as a different character. Carrying on a scene with a recording takes a lot of rehearsal and precision to make it seem real. Because of the device of exiting in various parts of the set, the sound needs to be sourced to specific locations so that it sounds like the voice is coming only from that area. The designer may decide to add some of that vocal to the main mix, but even so, having the sound originate from the area where the actor is supposed to be will help the gimmick.The set is also very important; realistic-looking, but with built-in escapes so that actors can exit, run around and enter from another location. Here is a description of the set that was used in Wichita. The main entrance to the MMG rehearsal studios upstage. A door with frosted glass, so you can’t quite make out who is at the door. Next to that entrance, there is a frosted set of windows in which one side can slide open and closed. It should be high enough so that an actor can be seen from the waist up when the window is open. Downstage center is a studio piano on casters and a bench. Stage left is a sound booth, a step up to the door - and glass window that runs along the booth. Inside, we see old recording equipment, a high back office chair, newspapers clippings, etc. [There need to be two hidden escape hatches in this room.] Downstage left of the recording booth, along the wall, there is a shelf with various show bizzy items on it, including a radio that will be used in Act Two. Next to that is a closet with a door. The doorknob on the closet door needs to be able to come off [trapping an actor inside, because it is “broken.”] We never see inside the closet, but actors need to escape from there as well. A little further on stage left is a desk and rolling chair. On the desk is an intercom, which needs to be wired for sound as it is used frequently in dialogue. Upstage right of the main entrance is an area with a coat rack, small table, water cooler, and an electrical outlet on the wall. Upstage right is a door which leads to the bathroom; one character compulsively brushes his teeth. We don’t see much inside the door, but you enter the bathroom and walk a little further off stage right to fully enter the bathroom. [There is an escape here as well.] Downstage right, on the same plane as the piano and desk, is a chaise lounge. Costumes are also very important. It was our intent that each character look and dress differently from the next, meaning full costume changes; not just putting on a hat or a jacket to indicate a different character. The off stage business is very tricky [not to mention sweaty] and requires a lot of planning and rehearsing. Two dressers are needed, and these two dressers also act as “doubles” for a couple of characters later. So physically they should somewhat resemble the two actors. They are never seen in light, so just a basic physical likeness.And finally, a few thoughts on the characters themselves. When we wrote it, we threw in every possible skill and talent we possess: both characters sing, play piano, tap dance, do physical comedy and impressions -- but it is not essential that both actors do all these things. In virtually every show we’ve played piano in, nobody ever believes we were actually playing [which drives you crazy!], so the piano can be angled in a way that prevents the audience from seeing the hands, or other tricky ways to make it appear as if the actors are playing: a speaker in the fake piano, keys that actually depress but make no sound, etc. As for impressions, the character who does most of the impressions also happens to be wearing fake teeth - this makes doing the impressions [or even just talking clearly] a challenge. It would be good if both actors are funny, sing and tap very well and have a very good understanding of those old MGM movies with Astaire and Kelly. Oh, and are EXTREMELY good-looking, like us.We are very proud of this show, and think it is funny as well as an incredible workout and challenge for the two actors, and calls for creativity from every department.


Performance Tools for Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce)

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Rental Materials for Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce)

STANDARD

  • Rehearsal Set
    • 5 – Libretto
    • 5 – Piano Vocal Score
    • 1 – Digital Logo
    • Digital Logo
  • DOUBLE TROUBLE - Orchestration (7 Books/7 Players)
    • 1 – Double Trouble - Orchestration (7 Books/7 Players)

ADDITIONAL

  • Pre-Production Pack
    • 1 – Libretto
    • 1 – Piano Vocal Score

Cast Requirements for Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce)

PRINCIPALS
2 Men

Double Trouble is performed by two actors, each playing one half of a singing, dancing and songwriting team as well as multiple other characters.

CHARACTERS
Bobby Martin
Jimmy Martin

Bobby’s Characters:
Merwin M. Garner – the boss of MMG Studios
Millie Ferber – Mr. Garner's secretary
Seymour Beckley – an intern
Rebecca Lefleurdelemaganis – the beautiful redhead movie star

Jimmy’s Characters:
Jenna Jumper – host of Jenna Jumper's Cavalcade of Stars
Preston Creest – a famous director-choreographer
Bix Minky – the audio engineer
Swifty Morris – a slick, Hollywood agent
Rebecca Lefleurdelemaganis – the beautiful redhead movie star

Set Requirements for Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce)

A unit set is recommended.

Materials Notes

Both performers in DOUBLE TROUBLE play the piano on stage in addition to one piano player in the pit. This is not essential – a fake piano may be use on stage (angled away from the audience) and a second piano player may be added to the pit.

Media Rights

Promotional

1. The Promotional Video shall be recorded and shown for the sole purposes of advertising your licensed production of the Play. For such a video, R&H allows theatres to film up to 10 minutes of total footage taken at either a performance or rehearsal (i.e.: 10 minutes of scripted moments.)

2. The Promotional Video may not include more than (i) 1 minute from any song or (ii) 3 minutes, in the aggregate, of footage of copyrighted material from the Play.

3. The Promotional Video may not include any sponsorship or underwriting without the prior consent of all R&H.

4. The Promotional Video must be submitted to R&H by sending the source video and video link to editor@rnh.com.

5. The Promotional Video must include the following: "Rights courtesy of Rodgers & Hammerstein, www.rnh.com"

6. Upon approval by R&H of the Promotional Video, you agree not to make any alterations in the approved copyrighted material used therein and you agree to obtain the prior written approval of R&H for any other use of the Promotional Video not specifically granted herein.

7. Upon termination of the Term, you shall cease to have any rights to use the Promotional Video including, without limitation, in connection with a future production of the Play, and shall immediately remove its content from any and all websites on the Internet.

8. You may not use a commercially available recording.

9. Any additional promotional rights must be approved by R&H by contactingTheatre@rnh.com.

 

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Archival

1. Subject to the information provided in Licensee’s application and payment of the fee as set forth in Paragraph 3 herein, Licensee shall have the right to create a single copy of the Video for internal archival, private viewing purposes at Licensee’s address only and shall not be re-copied, distributed or otherwise exploited, in whole or in part, in any media now known or hereafter developed without the prior written approval of R&H. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Video shall not be (i) sold to anyone (ii) telecast by any television station or network, including, without limitation, any local cable station or (iii) distributed, exhibited or otherwise exploited over the Internet or as part of any online auction.

2. Licensee agrees to include the following language at the beginning of the Video:

©Year By R&H Theatricals. This production was videotaped by special arrangement with R&H Theatricals for archival purposes only. All Rights Reserved.

WARNING: Federal law provides severe civil and criminal penalties for the unauthorized reproduction, distribution or exhibition of copyrighted motion pictures, videotapes or videodiscs. Criminal copyright infringement is investigated by the FBI and may constitute a felony with a maximum penalty of up to five years in prison and/or a $250,000.00 fine.

This Video is provided to you for private, organizational and home viewing purposes only. By accepting the Video, you agree not to authorize or permit the Video to be copied, distributed, broadcast, telecast or otherwise exploited, in whole or in part, in any media now known or hereafter developed.

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Distribution

1. Licensee shall have the right to create the Video and to make up to one hundred (100) copies of the Video for sale at cost to its Members for internal archival, private viewing purpose at Licensee’s address and for private, home-viewing purpose by Members, and shall not be re-copied, distributed or otherwise exploited, in whole or in part, in any media now known or hereafter developed without the prior written approval of R&H. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Video shall not be (i) sold to anyone other than the Members (ii) telecast by any television station or network, including, without limitation, any local cable station or (iii) distributed, exhibited or otherwise exploited over the Internet or as part of any online auction.

2. Licensee agrees to include the following language at the beginning of the Video:

©Year By R&H Theatricals. This production was videotaped by special arrangement with R&H Theatricals for archival purposes only. All Rights Reserved. WARNING: Federal law provides severe civil and criminal penalties for the unauthorized reproduction, distribution or exhibition of copyrighted motion pictures, videotapes or videodiscs. Criminal copyright infringement is investigated by the FBI and may constitute a felony with a maximum penalty of up to five years in prison and/or a $250,000.00 fine. This Video is provided to you for private, organizational and home viewing purposes only. By accepting the Video, you agree not to authorize or permit the Video to be copied, distributed, broadcast, telecast or otherwise exploited, in whole or in part, in any media now known or hereafter developed.

*You must be and licensed to present Double Trouble (A Musical Tour de Farce) in order to license Distribution rights. Please contact customer service with any questions.
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