Classic Musicals

Annie Get Your Gun

Annie Oakley is the best shot around, and she manages to support her little brother and sisters by selling the game she hunts. When she's discovered by Col. Buffalo Bill, he persuades this novel sharpshooter to join his Wild West Show. It only takes one glance for her to fall head over heels for dashing shooting ace Frank Butler, who headlines the show. She soon eclipses Butler as the main attraction which, while good for business, is bad for romance. Butler hightails it off to join a rival show, his bruised male ego leading the way, but is ultimately pitted against Annie in a final shoot-out. The rousing, sure-fire finale hits the mark every time in a testament to the power of female ingenuity.

Annie Get Your Gun (Stone)

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN scored a bulls eye when it returned to Broadway in 1999, starring Bernadette Peters and sporting a revised libretto by Tony, Oscar and Emmy winner Peter Stone. As Newsday reported, Stone's revisions 'are sweetly ingenious, and the show is a dream.' Stone reshaped the 1946 book to create a Wild West show-within-a-show that frames the ageless 'Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better' love story of sharpshooters Annie Oakley and Frank Butler. Stone has added a secondary romance between the younger sister of Frank's bothersome assistant Dolly, and a boy who is (to Dolly's horror) part Native American. 'The book has been updated in ways that pass p.c. muster,' reported Time Magazine, 'without losing all the fun.' Joined to the new book, of course, is that amazing Irving Berlin score, featuring hit after hit after hit. 'Irving Berlin's greatest achievement in the theater,' wrote the New York Post, ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 'will always be a musical for the ages, one of the Broadway theater's enduring triumphs.'

Babes in Arms (Guare)

The 1937 version of Rodgers & Hart's BABES IN ARMS is the quintessential 'Hey, kids, let's put on a show!' musical, boasting one of the greatest scores ever written. A group of teenagers are left without adult supervision when their folks hit the vaudeville summer circuit, and the local sheriff is determined to send the loafers to a work farm. But the determined kids talk the sheriff into a two-week reprieve, just enough time to produce their own show and prove their mettle. The son of a wealthy Southerner agrees to bankroll the production but only on the condition that the two black kids (roles created by the legendary Nicholas Brothers) not appear in the show. The other kids are outraged, but of course the show must go on and does, in a succession of comeuppance, reconciliation and romance. The old-fashioned virtues of a 30's musical comedy are peppered with socio-political issues which have remained resonant for more than six decades, and which later became the hallmark of Rodgers' collaboration with Hammerstein. But it's the sophisticated jocularity that make his musicals with Hart utterly unique, propelling these talented teens in their onward march toward self-discovery. The 1959 adaptation by George Oppenheimer is also available. Please specify which version you would like when ordering.

Babes in Arms (Oppenheimer Version)

This quintessential 'Hey, kids, let's put on a show!' musical boasts one of the greatest scores ever written. Set at a summer stock theatre, the plot concerns a group of young apprentices and their conviction to mount the original revue they've created while dodging the underhanded attempts of the surly theatre owner to squash their efforts at every turn. Further complications are provided by the overbearing stage mother of a beautiful ex-child star and the inflated ego of a hack southern playwright. But of course the show must go on, and so it does in a resolution of comeuppance, reconciliation and romance. This version is the 1959 adaptation by George Oppenheimer. The Original 1937 version is also available. Please specify which version you would like when ordering.

Big River

Twain's timeless classic sweeps us down the mighty Mississippi as the irrepressible Huck Finn helps his friend Jim, a slave, escape to freedom at the mouth of the Ohio River. Their adventures along the way are hilarious, suspenseful and heartwarming, bringing to life your favorite characters from the novel-the Widow Douglas and her stern sister, Miss Watson; the uproarious King and Duke, who may or may not be as harmless as they seem; Huck's partner in crime, Tom Sawyer, and their rowdy gang of pals; Huck's drunken father, the sinister Pap Finn; the lovely Mary Jane Wilkes and her trusting family. Propelled by an award winning score from Roger Miller, the king of country music, this jaunty journey provides a brilliantly theatrical celebration of pure Americana.

The Boys From Syracuse

Twins! More twins! Women-chased and chaste! The first musical ever adapted from Shakespeare remains the most madcap musical farce ever to animate the stage. Antipholus and his wily servant, Dromio, travel to Ephesus in search of their respective twins, from whom they were separated in a shipwreck. Naturally, they are immediately taken for their brothers and we're off and running on a riotous chase from marketplace to marital bed. Perplexed wives, disgruntled courtesans, outraged constables and an audience roaring with laughter are left in its wake before this show's tangled web is unraveled, and Rodgers & Hart & Abbott have triumphed once again!

Call Me Madam

Once President Harry S. Truman appointed Washington hostess Perle Mesta as Ambassador to Luxembourg, the foundation was laid for a musical comedy that would kid politics-foreign and domestic alike. Ambassador Sally Adams, with slim credentials, is sent off to administer in the tiny duchy of Lichtenburg. It's not long before her down-to-earth, typically undiplomatic manner has surprised and charmed the local gentry, especially the handsome Prime Minister. A second romance is blossoming between her young Ivy League aid and Lichtenburg's enchanting young Princess. The course of love is threatened by the stuffy opposition, who eventually succeed in wrangling Sally's recall, but not before all has resolved happily for both pairs of lovers.

Carousel

In a Maine coastal village toward the end of the 19th century, the swaggering, carefree carnival barker, Billy Bigelow, captivates and marries the naive millworker, Julie Jordan. Billy loses his job just as he learns that Julie is pregnant and, desperately intent upon providing a decent life for his family, he is coerced into being an accomplice to a robbery. Caught in the act and facing the certainty of prison, he takes his own life and is sent 'up there.' Billy is allowed to return to earth for one day fifteen years later, and he encounters the daughter he never knew. She is a lonely, friendless teenager, her father's reputation as a thief and bully having haunted her throughout her young life. How Billy instills in both the child and her mother a sense of hope and dignity is a dramatic testimony to the power of love. It's easy to understand why, of all the shows they created, CAROUSEL was Rodgers & Hammerstein's personal favorite.

Cinderella

The timeless enchantment of a magical fairy tale is reborn with the Rodgers & Hammerstein hallmarks of originality, charm and elegance. Originally presented on television in 1957 starring Julie Andrews, Rodgers & Hammerstein's CINDERELLA was the most widely viewed program in the history of the medium. Its recreation in 1965 starring Lesley Ann Warren was no less successful in transporting a new generation to the miraculous kingdom of dreams-come-true, and so was a second remake in 1997, which starred Brandy as Cinderella and Whitney Houston as her Fairy Godmother. As adapted for the stage, with great warmth and more than a touch of hilarity, the hearts of children and adults alike still soar when the slipper fits.

Cinderella (Broadway Version)

Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella is the new Broadway adaptation of the classic musical. This contemporary take on the classic tale features Rodgers & Hammerstein's most beloved songs, including “In My Own Little Corner,” “Impossible/It's Possible” and “Ten Minutes Ago,” alongside a hilarious and romantic libretto by Tony Award nominee Douglas Carter Beane as well as some new characters, and surprising twists.

Originally presented on television in 1957 starring Julie Andrews, Rodgers & Hammerstein's CINDERELLA was twice re-made, first in 1965 for Lesley Ann Warren and then again in 1997 featuring Brandy and Whitney Houston. The original Broadway production opened in 2013 and starred Laura Osnes, Santino Fontana, Victoria Clark and Harriet Harris.

Running Time: 2 hours, 15 minutes, including one intermission

For CINDERELLA (Original Version), click here.
For CINDERELLA (Enchanted Edition), click here.

Cinderella (Enchanted Edition)

The timeless enchantment of a magical fairy tale is reborn with the Rodgers & Hammerstein hallmarks of originality, charm and elegance. Originally presented on television in 1957 starring Julie Andrews, Rodgers & Hammerstein's CINDERELLA was the most widely viewed program in the history of the medium. Its recreation in 1965 starring Lesley Ann Warren was no less successful in transporting a new generation to the miraculous kingdom of dreams-come-true, and so was a second remake in 1997, which starred Brandy as Cinderella and Whitney Houston as her Fairy Godmother. As adapted for the stage, with great warmth and more than a touch of hilarity, the hearts of children and adults alike still soar when the slipper fits. This Enchanted Edition is based on the 1997 teleplay.

A Connecticut Yankee

On the eve of his wedding, our hero receives an unexpected visit from his former fiancée. When his current wife-to-be finds them together, she knocks the fellow out cold with - what else? - a champagne bottle. He awakes to find himself transported back to the days of Camelot where he charms King Arthur's court and is soon put in charge of industrializing the country. He falls in love only the have his armour kidnapped by the King's hilariously evil sister. He awakes from his prophetic dream realizing that he almost married the wrong girl. This delectable musical comedy with its willfully silly dedication to pure hi-jinks, was meticulously restored in 2001 for its presentation by the acclaimed Encores! series in New York City and is now available with Don Walker's thrilling orchestrations.

Do I Hear a Waltz?

Leona, an unmarried American secretary 'of a certain age,' goes on a vacation to Venice where, under the spell of that enchanted city, she falls in love. The gentleman is an attractive, middle-aged shopkeeper, whose attentions give flight to her deepest dreams of romance. Too soon, however, he openly informs her that he is a contented family man, and Leona's hopes are dashed. She can, for a short time, harness romance, yet realizes that such a relationship would have nowhere to go. Still, might it be better than never having loved at all? This timeless story, which is the basis of the movie 'Summertime' starring Katharine Hepburn, remains a bittersweet testament to the complexities of the heart.

Flower Drum Song

The generation gap is given the Rodgers & Hammerstein treatment in this colorful approach to the age-old conflict. In San Francisco's Chinatown of the late '50s, nightclub owner Sammy Fong's traditional family has ordered him a picture-bride from China, hoping to end his pursuit of an enticing dancer. Mei Li arrives, shy and at sea in a world she doesn't understand, and it's clear that she's the wrong gal for the totally assimilated Sammy. However, she may be just the ticket for Sammy's buddy, whose traditionalist father is fighting a losing battle with his kids against rock `n' roll, baseball, sports cars and the typical trappings of the modern American life-style. By turns raucous and heartfelt, the solution to this delightful Chinese puzzle of properly matching the young people while reconciling the old is a celebration of American ingenuity.

Flower Drum Song (Hwang Version)

'To create something new, we must first love what is old,' claims Mei-Li in Tony Award-winner David Henry Hwang's new adaptation of this Rodgers and Hammerstein jewel. The sentiment is obviously shared by the author himself, who has created something dazzlingly new while honoring the original material. Mei-Li flees Mao's communist China after the murder of her father and finds herself in San Francisco's Chinatown. This naïve young refugee is befriended by Wang, who is struggling to keep the Chinese opera tradition alive despite his son's determination to turn the old opera house into a swingin' Western-style nightclub. A unique blending of American razz-ma-tazz and stylized Chinese opera traditions creates a beautifully theatrical tapestry. The wonderful score, by turns lushly romantic and showbiz-brassy, retains all of its luster in this lovely new version of an American classic. Mei-Li's gradual assimilation is informed by her realization that the old and new can coexist when there is respect for both. It is in that spirit that R&H Theatricals makes available both the original and new versions of FLOWER DRUM SONG.

H.M.S. Pinafore

Gilbert and Sullivan are the undisputed masters of comic operetta and the proud parents of the modern musical. That their works are more in demand today than when they were created over a century ago is ample proof of their lasting brilliance. We are pleased to offer reduced orchestrations based on the D'Oyly Carte originals for productions of H.M.S. PINAFORE, THE MIKADO, or THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE. H. M. S. PINAFORE answers the burning question of who, among equals, is the most equal, but only when the men of the mismatched couples discover they were switched in their cradles as infants. Obviously the authors will stop at nothing to delight and amuse - and again they succeed!

THE KING AND I

East versus West makes for a dramatic, richly textured and ultimately uplifting tale of enormous fascination. It is 1862 in Siam when an English widow, Anna Leonowens, and her young son arrive at the Royal Palace in Bangkok, having been summoned by the King to serve as tutor to his many children and wives. The King is largely considered to be a barbarian by those in the West, and he seeks Anna's assistance in changing his image, if not his ways. With both keeping a firm grip on their respective traditions and values, Anna and the King grow to understand and, eventually, respect one another, in a truly unique love story. Along with the dazzling score, the incomparable Jerome Robbins ballet, 'The Small House of Uncle Thomas,' is one of the all-time marvels of the musical stage.

The Mikado

Gilbert and Sullivan are the undisputed masters of comic operetta and the proud parents of the modern musical. That their works are more in demand today than when they were created over a century ago is ample proof of their lasting brilliance. The hapless lovers in THE MIKADO are mercilessly buffeted by social restrictions, legal inconsistencies, judicial inequities, government stupidities, and that's just the first act! Poor dears - it would be absolutely tragic if it weren't so hysterically funny.

Oklahoma!

Rodgers & Hammerstein's first collaboration remains, in many ways, their most innovative, having set the standards and established the rules of musical theatre still being followed today. Set in a Western Indian territory just after the turn of the century, the high-spirited rivalry between the local farmers and cowboys provides the colorful background against which Curly, a handsome cowboy, and Laurey, a winsome farm girl, play out their love story. Although the road to true love never runs smooth, with these two headstrong romantics holding the reins, love's journey is as bumpy as a surrey ride down a country road. That they will succeed in making a new life together we have no doubt, and that this new life will begin in a brand-new state provides the ultimate climax to the triumphant OKLAHOMA!

On Your Toes

Gangsters, vaudeville and the Russian Ballet come together in this riotous, romantic romp. Junior's folks pull him from the family's vaudeville act and pack him off to school where he becomes a music teacher. He meets Sydney, a composer, and Frankie, a coed who's fallen hard for him, and together they set about trying to sell Sydney's new jazz ballet to a Russian ballet company. The prima ballerina wants to teach Junior more than a few new steps, but with her assistance, 'Slaughter On Tenth Avenue' is produced with Junior dancing the lead. In one of the funniest set pieces ever devised, Junior dances the premiere while being shot at from the audience by thugs who've mistaken him for a dancer who owes on a gambling debt. This landmark musical was directed by the legendary George Abbott and choreographed by newcomer George Balanchine, whose use of ballet here marked the first time in musical comedy that dance was a direct proponent of the plot.

One Touch of Venus

Modern art collector Whitelaw Savory unearths a long-lost statue of Venus of Anatolia and is thrilled to display her in his New York museum. But when a naïve young barber named Rodney unwittingly brings the statue to life, Venus fixes her affections on him and pursues him all over New York. Rodney’s shrewish fiancée doesn’t like this one bit, and Savory will do anything—including framing Rodney for murder—to recover his beloved statue. Rodney keeps trying to set things right, and poor Venus can’t understand why he doesn’t respond to her seductions. After a series of comic setups and mix ups involving a couple of thugs, a nagging mother, a wisecracking secretary, some ancient Anatolians and a good dose of Olympian magic, earthly order is restored and new love found.

Pal Joey

The penultimate Rodgers & Hart collaboration introduced the first anti-hero to propel a musical. Joey is an opportunistic cad, but he always seems to land on his feet. He elbows his way into a job at a seedy Chicago nightclub and is soon juggling the affections of a naive chorus girl and a wealthy society dame who just happens to be married. Once Joey has charmed the socialite into setting him up in his own joint, he ditches the chorine and is riding high, playing the big-time operator. When a punk threatens to spill the whole business to the socialite's husband, she decides that she's bored with Joey anyway, dumping him and the club. Having had a taste of his own medicine, you'd think Joey would head back to the sweet kid who really loves him. Wrong. Some things never change, but you know what? He's still on his feet.

Pipe Dream

From the pages of Steinbeck, the drifters and dropouts along Cannery Row spring to life in this uncommon story of love and hope. When Suzy, a homeless girl, is picked up for stealing food, she's taken in by Fauna, the big-hearted Madam of the Bear Flag Café (which is no café at all). Here she meets Doc, a carefree marine biologist, and soon romance is in the air. Rodgers & Hammerstein struck a new tone with PIPE DREAM-intimate, warm and highly personal. It illuminates their benevolence for those searching outcasts who, although seamy and degraded, are infinitely capable of every emotion and longing felt by the more fortunate members of society. As sung by Doc at the top of the show, the soulful message is simple: 'It takes all kinds of people to make up a world.' Is there a better one? Currently Not Available.

The Pirates of Penzance

Gilbert and Sullivan are the undisputed masters of comic operetta and the proud parents of the modern musical. That their works are more in demand today than when they were created over a century ago is ample proof of their lasting brilliance. We are pleased to offer reduced orchestrations based on the D'Oyly Carte originals for productions of H.M.S. PINAFORE,THE MIKADO or THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE. When the hero of THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE was but a boy, his father instructed his nurse to have him apprenticed as a pilot. She thought he said 'pirate' and thus the zany troubles began.

Show Boat

Spanning the years from 1880 to 1927, this lyrical masterpiece concerns the lives, loves and heartbreaks of three generations of show folk on the Mississippi, in Chicago and on Broadway (and their life-long friends). The primary plot follows Magnolia, the naive daughter of the show boat captain, as she marries a gambler and moves with him to Chicago. His gambling continues as his debts compound, and soon he deserts her and their young daughter. A subplot concerns the potential arrest of Magnolia's selfless best friend on charges of miscegenation when it's discovered that she is mulatto, and her subsequent downward spiral into despair. The passing of time reunites Magnolia and her now-grown daughter with her family on the show boat as well as with her husband, who eventually returns offering a hopeful second chance at familial fulfillment.

Show Boat (Hal Prince Version)

Since its premiere in 1927, SHOW BOAT has never stopped moving. For over seven decades this seminal musical has continued to evolve on a journey that has reflected the ongoing development of the lyric theater, confirming its status as the pivotal work bridging operetta and contemporary musical theater. After three film versions, numerous Broadway and London revivals, countless tours and recordings, legendary director Harold Prince took the helm for a new Broadway production in 1994 that instantly became the blockbuster hit of the season. With Oscar Hammerstein's eldest son William serving as advisor, Prince studied all previous versions of SHOW BOAT and, with the celebrated choreographer Susan Stroman, developed a version of the classic that was hailed as a triumph by critics and audiences alike. This epic musical spans 40 years in the lives of three generations of show folk, following theirs loves and heartbreaks, their ambitions and disappointments along the Mississippi River and in Chicago.

The Sound of Music

The final collaboration between Rodgers & Hammerstein was destined to become the world's most beloved musical. When a postulant proves too high-spirited for the religious life, she is dispatched to serve as governess for the seven children of a widowed naval Captain. Her growing rapport with the youngsters, coupled with her generosity of spirit, gradually captures the heart of the stern Captain, and they marry. Upon returning from their honeymoon they discover that Austria has been invaded by the Nazis, who demand the Captain's immediate service in their navy. The family's narrow escape over the mountains to Switzerland on the eve of World War II provides one of the most thrilling and inspirational finales ever presented in the theatre. The motion picture version remains the most popular movie musical of all time.

South Pacific

Set in an island paradise during World War II, two parallel love stories are threatened by the dangers of prejudice and war. Nellie, a spunky nurse from Arkansas, falls in love with a mature French planter, Emile. Nellie learns that the mother of his children was an island native and, unable to turn her back on the prejudices with which she was raised, refuses Emile's proposal of marriage. Meanwhile, the strapping Lt. Joe Cable denies himself the fulfillment of a future with an innocent Tonkinese girl with whom he's fallen in love out of the same fears that haunt Nellie. When Emile is recruited to accompany Joe on a dangerous mission that claims Joe's life, Nellie realizes that life is too short not to seize her own chance for happiness, thus confronting and conquering her prejudices.

State Fair

Rodgers & Hammerstein's only musical written directly for the screen is now a stage musical that's had critics raving from coast to coast. Set against the colorful backdrop of an American heartland tradition, STATE FAIR travels with the Frake family as they leave behind the routine of the farm for three days of adventure at the annual Iowa State Fair. Mom and Pop have their hearts set on blue ribbons while their daughter and son find romance and heartbreak on the midway. Set to the magical strains of an Academy Award-winning score and augmented by other titles from the Rodgers and Hammerstein songbook, STATE FAIR is the kind of warm-hearted family entertainment only Rodgers & Hammerstein could deliver!

Summer Stock Murder

This riotous musical mystery's three acts span three weeks at the Sagautasac Playhouse, a typical summer stock theatre. The company rehearses and presents a new musical in each act-a Friml-esque operetta, a Cole Porter-ish potpourri and a musical drama a la Sondheim. With the pressure on and temperaments soaring, a string of bizarre murders begins taking place. Accompanying this high drama of the hilarious sort is the low comedy of visiting stars and sex-crazed apprentices as crisis after crisis threatens each curtain. In a stroke of comic inspiration, one woman plays each of the visiting guest stars who arrive in each act-an ex-diva cum game show panelist, a B-movie sexpot, and a boozing broad from Broadway- making it a tour de force for a lucky singing actress. If the time has come to give your audience one they haven't seen, this is it!

The Threepenny Opera

Brecht and Weill turned to John Gay's 18th-century 'The Beggar's Opera' to fashion this savage, biting commentary on bourgeois capitalism and modern morality. Set in Victorian London, the bitter tale is told of the predatory outlaw known as Mack the Knife. He secretly marries the daughter of Soho's underworld boss, but is soon betrayed by his sinister in-laws and sent to prison. After being freed by the police chief's daughter, he is again betrayed- this time by a prostitute-and sentenced to death. At the final hour he manages a reprieve from Queen Victoria herself, thus providing a menacing finale of ferocious irony.

A Time for Singing

A lost treasure from the 1960s, A TIME FOR SINGING is based on How Green Was My Valley, Richard Llewellyn’s classic novel of a Welsh mining village. Librettist Gerald Freedman and Oscar-nominated composer John Morris weave a spirited and sentimental tale of the Morgan family and their struggles of love and labor at the turn of a century. Excellent for a large ensemble cast, A TIME FOR SINGING asks, “Do we ever know what we have, till we no longer have it?”

The Tin Pan Alley Rag

Although there is no historic record of Irving Berlin and Scott Joplin ever having met, it's not unlikely that the legendary songwriters' paths might have crossed in that district of New York City known in the early part of the 20th century as Tin Pan Alley. That's the premise of this intriguing musical play, set into motion when the aging Joplin happens into young Berlin's office in search of a publisher for his opera, TREEMONISHA. The ensuing musical discourse highlights influential and emotional moments from each of their lives. This bracing, original piece contrasts the ironic similarities and differences between the men to the sustaining surge of musical abundance. While Joplin received a conservatory education as the prodigy of a father born into slavery, it was Berlin, the Russian immigrant who couldn't read music, who had his first international hit song at the age of 23. What becomes clear is that both Berlin and Joplin possessed musical gifts beyond measure and shared a passionate humanity, both of which are beautifully showcased and illuminated in THE TIN PAN ALLEY RAG.

Two by Two

Richard Rodgers entered his seventh decade of writing for the theatre with this fresh retelling of the Biblical story of Noah. It seems that the building of the ark was only the first of Noah's many daunting challenges in a journey that wasn't always smooth sailing. By turns inspirational and hilarious, we discover that being chosen by God for great things does not necessarily simplify the daily demands made of a father and husband. It's good fun from The Good Book and when the land has dried, man and beast alike are invited to go forth and prosper in a bright New World.

White Christmas

Based on the beloved, timeless film, this heartwarming musical adaptation features seventeen Irving Berlin songs and a book by David Ives and Paul Blake.
Veterans Bob Wallace and Phil Davis have a successful song-and-dance act after World War II. With romance in mind, the two follow a duo of beautiful singing sisters en route to their Christmas show at a Vermont lodge, which just happens to be owned by Bob and Phil's former army commander. The dazzling score features well known standards including Blue Skies, I Love A Piano, How Deep Is the Ocean and the perennial favorite, White Christmas. WHITE CHRISTMAS is an uplifting musical worthy of year-round productions.

 

Disclaimer: The Broadway and National Tour key art or any variations on it, may not be used in connection with licensed productions.

A Wonderful Life

Frank Capra's film classic has been brought to vibrant theatrical life through the remarkable collaboration of Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winner Sheldon Harnick and Grammy and Emmy Award-winner Joe Raposo. The story of George Bailey and his wonderful life in Bedford Falls remains a timeless fable of dreams, disillusionment and the power of love. An uplifting chronicle of the extraordinary lives of ordinary folk, A WONDERFUL LIFE exhilarates the mind and heart as it celebrates the innate goodness in us all.